Things that could have been done on the IWB

On the wall or on the IWB?

You've got an interactive whiteboard (IWB), but what should you use it for?

One of the places you will find ideas is just by looking at what you and your collegues have their learners post on the classroom walls.

In the image, above, the learners had constructed a diagram using card, pieces of paper and glue, to illustrate the different meanings of get. They could in fact have done exactly the same thing on the IWB, saved it, come back to it, re-edited and added to it, manipulated it, exported it and so on.

You've got an IWB but don't use it…? Stop, at the end of your lesson, and ask yourself "Could I have done any of that, and done it better, with the IWB?"

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4 Comments

  1. Nice idea, but the wall version will always be on display whereas the IWB version would only be displayed for that lesson, won't it?! If it could be done on the board and printed on a large colour poster, now THAT would be good!

    BTW that's adapted from Cutting Edge UI, isn't it?! Coincidentally I used that very page today!

  2. Cutting Edge? Couldn't be sure, but it might well be, as it's one of the coursebooks my colleagues use.

    It's true that on the wall it is permanently visible — but it's also true that because it's been glued it cannot be manipulated further, as it could be on the IWB.

    My suggestion would be that what you (i.e. your learners) can create on the IWB can then exported — say to a blog — and made visible there.

    (And yes, you could also print it from the IWB…)

  3. Agree with you Tom. Nice to put things on classroom walls to decorate them and that but once they're there, no one ever actually reads them. With the whiteboard, being able to remanipulate what you've done means that the learners actively get to revise it.

  4. Hi Tom,

    I agree about displaying work on a blog, I think that's definitely the way forward, then the 'classroom wall' is visible to all! Of course, then you can include audio as well as visual material. I've used a class blog for the first time this year and it's been a great experience.

    R

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