Less grammar, fewer photocopies and images

Above, something I'm 99% sure Michael Lewis said at the IH Barcelona ELT Conference back in 2008, though it isn't something to be found in the handout (.pdf) from the session.

In my own session for this year's event I'm going to be suggesting that in ELT we've got lost, at least as far as technology is concerned. In the session, I'm not going to deal with who's to blame but, for what it's worth, part of what has gone wrong is that in many schools we've provided teachers with unrestricted access to photocopiers, with the result that whilst the rest of the world has raced on into the 21st century, a significant proportion of language teachers (data in the session) are still waiting in the queue to waste rainforests.

I suppose what Michael Lewis said stuck in my head (I know I wrote it down somewhere!) and I realised the other day that I was paraphrasing him in a training session when I said this:

I've always wondered what effect having the photocopiers stolen would have on teaching in the various schools I either work in or have contact with. Assuming we did actually want to get new monsters, if they couldn't be installed for a week, or a month, and we assessed honestly at the end of that period (the longer the better), would we find that our teaching — and our learners' learning — had suffered, or gotten better in some way?

There are good reasons why we might in fact want to try going photocopyless (one of my favourite words, but only 3 results in Google!!!).

We could say the same for images:

The notion that "an image is worth 1000 words" is another of the things that, it seems to me, has led us astray. What we want is fewer, better images, ones that will produce more — and more meaningful, and more communicativelanguage from our learners.

Reason #1 to go to conferences and workshops: the little things you scribble down that then go on to make a difference to how and what you teach.

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