Sketchnotes for language teachers

Never heard of sketchnotes? A heads-up in a great TED talk

Here's one that I suggested in my session at the IH Barcelona ELT Conference back in February (yes, I've been kinda busy since 😉 !). I suggested sketchnoting for anyone who ever has to attend conferences and listen to presentations (etc), but also because some of the ideas behind it are of interest to presenters — and also to teachers in general.

My experience of language teaching is that as teachers we buy into the bullshit that "a picture is worth a thousand words" and assume that that means we use Google Images for everything — job done!

Wrong! Images are only worth a thousand words if you put them to work, and drawing live, in front of learners is doing that — using drawing to convey and clarify meaning and ideas and so on. And, as I suggested in my session, it's not just the teachers, but also the learners that can be doing the drawing.

In language teaching, where we're not lecturing (hopefully 😉 !), my suggestion is that we're not so much really sketchnoting as pinching the idea that drawing can be a powerful tool to aid understanding and learning.

My colleague at IH Barcelona Susana Ortiz suggested to me a couple of great examples of how sketching ideas could be used in language teaching. With trainees on pre-service courses for Spanish teachers, Susana gets them to illustrate how "communication" occurs by using circles and arrows; and with learners on Spanish courses, gets them to illustrate the difference between ser and estar with simple drawings (try the same with bring and take, if you teach English, to give you another example.)

Below, a further example, which I use when attempting to explain to trainees how we get swamped by too information on social media, and how we need to (a) "follow" fewer people and (b) "engage" with those we do follow somehow, either by actually using what we "like" or by engaging in actual dialogue with them (via tweets or blog comments, for example):

Diagrammatically:

Drowning in social media

The vicious circle of find-like-forget… Because on social media you forget the minute you instantly find something else

See also this post for a further example of a simple diagram to illustrate a complex idea to pre-service teachers.

More on sketchnotes
Sunni Brown's book, The Doodle Revolution (Amazon.co.uk), is one that I can recommend both for the arguments it puts forward but also because it will help you get started doodling — and sketchnoting.

And some great links:

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